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Jump for Wildlife

Join us at Wildplay Elements Park in Maple Ridge on September 29th, 2018!

Take a risk for BC’s at-risk species by facing your fears and jumping off the “What’s to Fear” jump at Wildplay Elements Park, with all proceeds raised going back to support the BC Wildlife Federation.

There are two ways you can come out and support the BC Wildlife Federation!

You can Jump for Wildlife: Participants can register through our online sign-up form to jump off the “What’s to Fear” jump, an unnerving plunge from 40 feet, to raise funds and awareness for BC’s at risk and endangered fish and wildlife! You can sign up as part of the BC Wildlife Federation team or you can create your own team. Once you’ve registered we will help you create an online giving page for you to share with your social networks and collect donations through a safe and secure online platform. You will also be given a pledge sheet to collect cash and cheque donations, as well as a list of fundraising ideas to try. The funds you raise will be put to work to protect and enhance BC’s fragile wild spaces and species at risk. As a thank-you for your fundraising efforts, your entry for Wildplay and the “What’s to Fear” jump will be complementary!

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You can come and watch: Not keen on taking the 40 foot plunge? That’s okay! Come on out on September 29th and watch others do the “What’s to Fear” jump. On September 29th, 25% of your Wildplay registration will go back to support the BC Wildlife Federation! Come and cheer on your family and friends as they take the jump and enjoy a day of fun activities. Don’t forget to support our jumpers! Your gift could be the encouragement they need to take the 40 foot plunge!

Have a question or need help signing-up? We are here to help! Contact Jessica at 604-882-9988 or giving@bcwf.bc.ca

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Venison Wontons

Sossy Outdoors: Venison Wontons

Having a party and want to serve a delicious appetizer that will wow your guests? This is the one! Delicious, full of flavor, and a wonderful way to showcase the versatility of Venison Meat.

Ingredients: 

2 cups ground Venison

1 cup chopped shrimp

1 cup ground pork

2 tablespoons soya sauce

2 tablespoons brown sugar

¼ cup sesame oil

1 can chopped water chestnuts

2 tablespoons Lemon grass paste

¼ cup of rice wine

½ cup chopped scallions

Dipping Sauce:

½ cup rice wine

¼ cup soya sauce

¼ cup sesame oil

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Blend all ingredients well in a bowl. Allow to marinate for at least an hour, but overnight is best. Any wonton wrappers from your local supermarket will do. Spoon filling into wonton wrapper, about a teaspoon. Pinch the top of the wonton with damp fingers.

Boil Method: Drop into boiling water, about 2-3 minutes or until they float. Serve with well blended dipping sauce.

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Deep Fry: Drop into fryer basket with oil set at 350’. Take out when Wontons are a deep golden brown. Serve with Plum Sauce.

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Urban Hunter Fighting for Wildlife

IMG_0219Alex Johnson went hunting for the first time in the fall of 2014 at the age of 29. He was drawn to hunting for the food opportunities and was lucky enough to be invited to join a well established group who were happy to share their knowledge and experience.  He first became concerned about conservation the following year after seeing the level of road density and deforestation on the way to and from a LEH moose hunt.  He then learned about the declining moose populations in much of the province and became interested in becoming active in conservation.

The natural heritage of BC is something which Alex feels needs to be protected and restored for the benefit of future generations. The native animals and plants of BC are what make our province such a special place. Additionally, he feels that having a strong connection with these animals and their habitats is the most important way to ensure that people will fight to protect them.

After listening to Jesse Zeman of the BC Wildlife Federation on the Rookie Hunter Podcast and the perspective of Steven Rinella on MeatEater, it became clear to Alex that there was widespread misunderstanding in the public about hunting, conservation, and declining wildlife populations.

The misinformation and lack of public awareness about hunting became acutely evident throughout the process which resulted in the ban on hunting grizzly bears.  It was the push he needed to become a Wildlife Warrior.

Since then, Alex has met with his MLA, spoken to the office of the Ministry of Forests, Lands, Natural Resource Operations & Rural Development, become involved in conservation organizations, provided feedback to government engagement initiatives, and started a blog www.vancouverhunter.com. In the future, he hopes to regularly meet with his MLA, help grow the number of wildlife advocates, and recruit other urbanites from non-hunting backgrounds to become hunter conservationists and increase awareness in the lower mainland.

Family Fishing Day

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We were at the Fraser Valley Trout Hatchery on Saturday June 16th, taking in the festivities of Family Fishing Day. This year was the 19th annual province wide fishing event! It is a day for families to come out and fish for free without having to purchase a license. It’s a great way for families to get outdoors and experience to pure joy of fishing, with many of the youngsters catching their very first fish!

Knowledgeable volunteers were on hand to help parents and children bate their hooks and cast their reels. Conservation Officers were also around, measuring the fish the children caught and educating them on basic fishing regulations. Families were able to take home one fish per child, if the child caught the fish. At the end of the day each child was handed a bucket with a trout inside to replenish the ponds with more fish.

DSC_0059We would like to congratulate Dean Worrall on winning the Bass Pro fishing rod we raffled off.A big thank-you goes out to the Freshwater Fisheries Society of BC who hosted the Family Fishing Day event in Abbotsford!

We hope everyone who came out had a fantastic time and we hope to see you again next year!

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Words from a past president

DSCN1414Les Husband currently, and has been for ten years, the Fire Centre Manager for the BC Wildfire Service and he manages the Prince George Fire Centre.

With the Federation, Les is Vice President for Harvey Andrusak. Indirectly, Les has been a club member since 1980 and directly as a board member from 1993 to 2003.

“I’m very much interested in fish, wildlife and habitat. I’m an avid hunter, angler and trapper. In 1993 there was an opportunity to run for the board. I thought for myself I could bring some very much needed qualities to the board. For me it’s a chance to be involved at a higher level.”

Les hoped by being more involved he could have a bit more influence. He wanted to make sure that number one: the Federation is moving forward, and number two: to extend some of the advantages he had to work on some partnerships with the government, so they could work to build some of the fish and wildlife resources in the province.

“That was it, to get on the board, to be part of a higher level of decision making and then eventually, when I became president, to lead an organization that I thought did a lot of good work. I’d rather be part of the solution and be a part of trying to look towards the future and make sure that there will be resources for us down the road, rather than sit back and do nothing. I’m not that kind of guy, I like to be involved, I like to be hands on.”

Les says, as a whole the Federation and the clubs that make up the Federation put in hundreds of thousands of hours of work on the ground.

“At the end of the day, there isn’t another group around that puts as much time and dollars into work to actually improve fish and wildlife in their habitat. You hear some of these cliches of the Federation being one of the oldest and largest  conservation organizations in the province, and I believe to this day that that is still the truth. Our organization does a lot of good work, but it’s not as much now as it was in the past due to a lot more restrictions being in place. ”

For Les, he was always interested in doing work on the ground with fisheries and wildlife.DSC00845

“I grew up in Revelstoke and our club did a lot of work on little projects. And that was always the interest, to get hands on and actually make a difference.”  

As things progressed Les got on the board, and his role with the Federation became structured in influencing other organizations, especially the government; to hold them accountable for the responsibility of handling the fish and wildlife resources of the province.

Les was president of the BC Wildlife Federation from 1998 to 2000. During that time he believes the Federation did some really good things.

“I think we did a lot of really good things, a lot of improvements and a lot of issues that were part of the province at that time, and I think we came up with some good solutions. From my perspective, the influence that our board had and that I had as a president was very positive.”

In the late 1990s, a lot of anti-hunting movements become very vocal. Les and the rest of the BCWF Board of Directors spent  a lot of time deflecting issues that were being brought forward by anti-hunting organizations. The Federation was also involved in land use planning during the 90s and took a lead on gun control with new gun regulations that were presented in Bill C68. On many of these matters the Federation maintained a working relationship with the government.

“Our opinion from the Federation prospective has always been respected by the government, because we bring a balance and a position that is often defensible and we don’t come and criticize, we bring solutions. I always thought the government really respected that and the way that our organization and membership operates.”

As a  past president, Les will continue to be involved in the Federation, to be there for support and advice for future board members and he will continue to do what he can for fish and wildlife in the province.

“I think that most of the people that have moved up through the ranks of the Federation from the regions to the board to the executives, even to the presidents have a  really vested interest in the fish and wildlife in this province. It’s not just the fact that they hunt and fish, it’s all the other pieces that go through being outside. The outdoors are something that they value and I think that is the main reason why folks get involved. They respect the outdoors, they respect what we have in this province for diversity, and I think that is what draws a lot of folks in and they want to be apart of solving some of the issues.”

Les says the Federation is not just for a single interest.

“We have such a broad stroke of fish and wildlife committees and issues that we deal with on a daily basis. I feel there is always going to be something there for somebody, as long as they are interested in the outdoors.”

~ By Cheyenne Bergenhenegouwen